Faculty Collaborating with the Energy Institute

Director

Tester, Jefferson

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Director of the Cornell Energy Institute and
Associate Director for Energy in the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.

Research Interests: Geothermal energy and biomass-based fuels are the focus of Jeff Tester’s research. In the geothermal area, his research group is evaluating the performance of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and geothermal heat pumps with specific projects on advanced drilling methods, regional assessment of low enthalpy geothermal resources, thermal hydraulic and system modeling of fractured geothermal reservoirs for power, district heating and co-generation applications, and evaluations of heat pumps for cooling applications in cell towers and data centers.  In the bioenergy area, integrated life cycle assessment and techno-economic models of biomass systems are being developed along with experimentally probing of kinetics, phase behavior and transport phenomena in hydrothermal and supercritical media at elevated temperatures and pressures for applications in the conversion and upgrading of a range of biomass feedstocks  from high lipid algae and food processing wastes to lignin cellulosic residuals and agricultural wastes.

Email: jwt54@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-7211
Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=jwt54

Associate Director

Barthelmie, Rebecca

Research Interests: Professor Barthelmie's research is focused on wind energy resources and wind turbine wakes within and downwind of large wind farms both on- and offshore. In Denmark, she ran the offshore wind energy network and she was involved in the development of many offshore wind farms. In the US, her focus has been wind energy resources and impacts of wakes and their interaction with the boundary-layer within large wind farms both offshore and in complex terrain. Her research involves measurements, particularly the application of remote sensing including lidar, modeling and data analysis of large wind farm data sets.
Email: rb737@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6423
Website: http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=rb737

Hanrath, Tobias

Research Interests: There is a tremendous opportunity space for nanostructured materials to play a key role in next generation energy technologies. Our research efforts focus on the fundamental study of optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals; this work is inspired by the potential application of these materials in solar energy conversion and energy storage devices. The semiconductor nanocrystals used in our work provide a diverse set of building blocks whose electronic and optical properties differ from their bulk counterparts due to the spatial wavefunction confinement. This quantum confinement effect allows us to engineer the materials properties through simple adjustments in nanocrystal size, shape, composition, and surface chemistry. In addition to their immense potential for technological applications, these materials also provide a material system to experimentally test fundamental quantum mechanical concepts.
Email: th358@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-351-2544
Website:  http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=th358

Lohman, Rowena

Research Interests: Professor Lohman's specific research involves the use of satellite-based remote sensing observations of ground deformation before and during earthquakes. Her primary focus will be on identifying anomalous behavior along fault zones and ingesting these observations into models of the dynamics of earthquake nucleation and rupture by using geodetic observations of ground deformation, primarily InSAR. Much of her work will involve development of methods for fully capitalizing on the rapidly increasing volumes of imagery available from international satellite platforms.
Email: rbl62@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6929
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=rbl62

 

Cowen, Edwin (Todd): Associate Director for Energy in the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

Ex-Officio Energy Institute Leadership Team

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Research Interests: Cowen has built an environmental fluid mechanics research program centered on four themes: environmental transport processes, water wave induced flows, lake hydrodynamics (physical limnology), and quantitative imaging techniques. He has developed experimental techniques, built new facilities, and undertaken basic research in: the dispersal of mass by jets and low-momentum point sources; scale-dependent dispersion, swash zone (the region of the beach face that is alternately dry and wet) turbulence; wave-structure interaction; exchange processes at embayment-lake connections; residence time in natural water bodies; internal waves in lakes and reservoirs, the effects of macrophytes on the mass and momentum transport processes, gas transfer by turbulence at an air-water interface, sediment suspension by turbulence at a sediment-water interface, and the remote sensing of discharge (flow rate) by optical means. Cowen's work on environmental turbulence, particularly the wake-wake interactions in macrophyte canopies, has lead to his recent push into the field of wind energy with research interests in wind turbine wakes and wind farm siting and optimization. Cowen is recognized as an authority in the areas of experimental measurements in fluid flows and environmental fluid mechanics and is a member of the editorial board of the journal Experiments in Fluids and an associate editor of the journal Environmental Fluid Mechanics.

Email: eac20@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-5140
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=eac20

Biological and Environmental Engineering

Ahner, Beth

Research Interests:  Prof. Ahner’s current energy-related research  is focused on the growth and use of algae biomass.  Algae can extract dilute nutrients from waste water, efficiently fix CO2 and simultaneously produce valuable products including biofuel and protein for animal feed.  Optimization of algae biomass production in ponds or reactors requires diagnostic tools to interrogate various aspect of algae physiology; these tools range from rapid detection of intracellular lipid content of individual cells to RNA-based detection of specific biochemical stress responses.  In one on-going project we are developing a new set of RNA-based bioassays that could be used to improve production systems.  We are also working on the production of new transgenic strains of algae that will simultaneously produce high value proteins.  The functional proteins will provide added benefits to the use of algae protein in feed markets.

Email: baa7@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2270
Website:  http://bee.cornell.edu/people/profile-ahner.cfm

Anderson, C. Lindsay

Research:  In order to meet both environmental targets and energy needs in the future, a significant portion of our electricity supply will be procured from renewable energy sources that are also uncertain and variable. As the proportion of these sources increases, the existing power systems and operators will require new technology and new operational methods to preserve reliability and security. The Anderson research group is focused on mathematical and computational methods that maximize effectiveness of operations under uncertain forecasts, and maximize use of complementary technologies such as storage and responsive demand. This is an interdisciplinary research program with aspects of operations, optimization, as well as environmental and systems engineering.  Prof. Anderson holds field memberships in Biological and Environmental Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell, and an Adjunct appointment in Applied Mathematics at Western University (Canada).

Impacts of Uncertainty in Biobased Industries - this is a developing project in collaboration with Professor Larry Walker and the Biofuels Research Laboratory.

Email: cla28@cornell.edu
Phone:607.255.4533
Website: http://bee.cals.cornell.edu/people/catherine-anderson

Angenent, Largus

Research Interests: Lars Angenent is interested in converting organic materials with undefined mixed cultures, defined mixed cultures, or pure cultures of microbes to generate specific products, such as the energy carriers – methane; carboxylates; electric current; n-butanol. Pretreatment of the biomass may be necessary to increase the conversion rates, and therefore Lars Angenent is also interested in physical/chemical (e.g., dilute acid method), thermochemical (e.g., slow pyrolysis), and biological pretreatment steps. In regards to bioprocessing steps, Lars Angenent studies anaerobic digestion, anaerobic fermentation, bioelectrochemical systems, syngas fermentation, and ABE fermentation. Other areas of interest are biosensors and biocomputing devices that are based on bioelectrochemical systems (BESs); and photobioreactors.  For organic waste conversion into bioenergy, Lars Angenent is promoting the carboxylate platform as an important platform in biorefineries because water and nutrients must be recycled while bioenergy yields must be maximized. This platform is based on microbial conversions with undefined mixed cultures that can handle the complexity and variability of organic wastes. Therefore, Lars Angenent is interested in the microbial community dynamics in engineered systems. For this reason, his lab utilizes second-generation sequencing platforms in combination with powerful bioinformatic tools and ecology theory.

Email: la249@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2480
Website: http://angenent.bee.cornell.edu/DrLarsAngenent.html

Scott, Norm (Emeritus)

Research Interests: My research interests are in sustainable development. I believe "sustainable development" is the dominant economic, environmental and social issue for the 21st century. To meet this challenge requires an entrepreneurship, which combines energy, environmental, industrial, and agricultural knowledge and innovation. The objective is to combine science, engineering, technology, economics, and social principles to "engineer" new ecologically sustainable communities. The concept represents the epitome of systems analysis- a challenge combining the insight from the physical sciences with those of the biological and social sciences. Characteristics of a sustainable community will be based in biologically-derived fuels, renewable energy, recycling, energy conservation, reduced transportation, managed ecosystems, advanced housing systems and sustainable agriculture. "

Email: nrs5@cornell.edu
Phone: (607) 351-3147
Website:  http://bee.cornell.edu/people/profile-scott.cfm
National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Member: https://www.nae.edu/MembersSection/MemberDirectory/27805.aspx

 

Chemical Engineering

Anton, Brad

Research Interests: Anton's research investigates the mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in fluids and at interfaces between fluid and solid phases.

Email: aba6@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-255-3629

Website: http://www.engineering.cornell.edu/research/faculty/profile.cfm?netid=aba6

Archer, Lynden

Research Interests: Research in the Archer group focuses on the synthesis, science, and technological applications of polymers, complex fluids, and nanoscale organic-inorganic hybrid materials (NOHMs) for electrochemical energy storage.

Email: laa25@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-8825
Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=laa25

Clancy, Paulette

Research Interests: This includes Molecular Simulation studies of semiconductor materials covering a broad range from traditional Si and Si-rich materials, to organic electronics (e.g., pentacene, C60, thiophenes, etc), to organic/inorganic hybrids (especially ligand-capped nanocrystal superlattices). Complementary algorithm development in stochastic simulations, Kinetic Monte Carlo (esp. off-lattice).  Virtually unique focus on studies of materials processing and thin film growth.

Email: pqc1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-7713
Website:  http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=pqc1

Daniel, Susan

Research Interests:  In the Daniel Research Group we investigate how the chemical, physical, and organizational properties of molecules at a surface impact the interactions of the interface with other materials and the dynamic phenomena that result from those interactions. We study phenomena at both biological interfaces and chemically patterned surfaces that interact with soft matter – liquids; polymers; and biological materials, like cells, viruses, proteins, and lipids. In the context of energy and sustainability, we strive to design interfaces that reduce the costs of creating energy and transporting it. Towards this end we have created surfaces that use surface tension forces to remove liquid condensate from heat exchanger surfaces, greatly enhancing heat transfer coefficients. On the biointerface side, we have worked on understanding the characteristics of algae cell surfaces that lead to tunable aggregation for the efficient processing of biofuel extraction.

Email: sd386@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-4675
Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=sd386

Engstrom, James

Research Interests: Gas-surface dynamics via molecular beam scattering. Inorganic-organic interfaces and molecular-based electronics. Atomic layer deposition. In-situ monitoring and control of thin film processes, including X-ray synchrotron radiation, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectrometry.

Email: jre7@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9934
Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=jre7

 

Hanrath, Tobias

Research Interests: There is a tremendous opportunity space for nanostructured materials to play a key role in next generation energy technologies. Our research efforts focus on the fundamental study of optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals; this work is inspired by the potential application of these materials in solar energy conversion and energy storage devices. The semiconductor nanocrystals used in our work provide a diverse set of building blocks whose electronic and optical properties differ from their bulk counterparts due to the spatial wavefunction confinement. This quantum confinement effect allows us to engineer the materials properties through simple adjustments in nanocrystal size, shape, composition, and surface chemistry. In addition to their immense potential for technological applications, these materials also provide a material system to experimentally test fundamental quantum mechanical concepts.

Email: th358@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-351-2544
Website:  http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=th358

Joo, Yong

Research Interests:  Our research focuses on the integration of continuum analysis with molecular details in polymeric materials processing. Areas of current interests include the microstructural rheology and processing of complex fluids, the formation of nanofibers via electrospinning, and the occurrence of viscoelastic instabilities in polymer flows. In particular, we have laid the foundation for new experimental and theoretical studies on nanofiber formation via electrospinning. The resulting nanofibers are collected as non-woven mats with large surface area to volume ratios which can be used in filtration, catalysis, membrane applications and reinforced composites. We develope comprehensive models to provide a fundamental understanding of nanofiber formation and we investigate the material-processing-structure relationship in nanoscale fibers. Nanofibers with controlled nano/microstructures are also being utilized in various fundamental studies such as hydrogen production via alkaline hydrolysis of cellulose.

Email: ylj2@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-255-8591

Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=ylj2

Koch, Donald

Research Interests: Our research focuses on developing theoretical understanding of fluid dynamics and heat and mass transfer in multiphase flows, particle suspensions and porous media. Current interests include: Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide; Geothermal energy extraction; The effect of fluid transport on the formation of dense fracture networks by hydraulic fracturing; The effect of turbulence-induced droplet coalescence on the formation of precipitation in clouds; Hydrodynamic instabilities due to preferential concentration of aerosol particles; Cross-flow filtration separations by size and shape using hydrodynamic lift and particle-trajectory ratcheting mechanisms; and The design of nanostructured electrolytes to inhibit dendrite growth in batteries.

Email: dlk15@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3484
Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=dlk15

Stroock, Abraham

Research Interests: The Stroock lab focuses on manipulating dynamics and chemical processes on micrometer scales. Current efforts in the lab relate to 1) the study and application of mechanisms for manipulating liquids inspired by plants, 2) fundamental studies of the properties of liquid water at negative pressure, 3) studies of the biophysical processes that control vascular development and applications of these processes in tissue engineering, and 4) theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of fluid mechanical processes on small scales for chemical process.

Email: ads10@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-4276
Website:  http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=ads10

Tester, Jeff

Director of the Cornell Energy Institute and
Associate Director for Energy in the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.

Research Interests: Geothermal energy and biomass-based fuels are the focus of Jeff Tester’s research. In the geothermal area, his research group is evaluating the performance of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and geothermal heat pumps with specific projects on advanced drilling methods, regional assessment of low enthalpy geothermal resources, thermal hydraulic and system modeling of fractured geothermal reservoirs for power, district heating and co-generation applications, and evaluations of heat pumps for cooling applications in cell towers and data centers.  In the bioenergy area, integrated life cycle assessment and techno-economic models of biomass systems are being developed along with experimentally probing of kinetics, phase behavior and transport phenomena in hydrothermal and supercritical media at elevated temperatures and pressures for applications in the conversion and upgrading of a range of biomass feedstocks  from high lipid algae and food processing wastes to lignin cellulosic residuals and agricultural wastes.

Email: jwt54@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-7211
Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=jwt54

You, Fengqi

Research Interests: Dr. You's research focuses on energy and environmental systems engineering. Particular research interests lie in (1) Sustainable design and synthesis of energy systems, including biofuels processes, photovoltaics, carbon capture and separation, and shale gas, (2) Systems analysis, modeling and optimization for the water-energy nexus, (3) Sustainable manufacturing, sustainable operations (planning & scheduling) and control of advanced manufacturing systems, (4) Life cycle analysis and optimization of energy, environmental and economic systems, (5) Leveraging big data analytics for sustainability analysis and optimization under deep uncertainty, and (6) Sustainability analysis of nanotechnology and advanced materials.
Email: fengqi.you@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-1162
Click Here to View Faculty Profile

 

Zia, Roseanna

Research Interests: In the Zia Research Group our goal is to understand and elucidate the micro-mechancical underpinnings of macroscopic material behaviors in complex fluids and other soft matter, with a focus on non-equilibrium systems. Problems of interest include the storage of the microstructural entropy that underlies mechanical stress, the imbalance between fluctuation and dissipation driven by stress gradients, and the structural coarsening that enables sudden collapse of dynamically arrested gels, to name a few. From this understanding we work out new theories to predict macroscopic behaviors from the detailed evolution of particle microstructure. We have a dual aim: first, to discover fundamental mechanisms that may lead to entirely new understanding of non-equilibrium dynamics in complex media; and second, to apply our theory to advanced technologies ranging from disease treatment to smart materials.

Email: rnz6@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-254-3354

Website: http://www.cheme.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=rnz6

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Cowen, Edwin (Todd)

Research Interests: Cowen has built an environmental fluid mechanics research program centered on four themes: environmental transport processes, water wave induced flows, lake hydrodynamics (physical limnology), and quantitative imaging techniques. He has developed experimental techniques, built new facilities, and undertaken basic research in: the dispersal of mass by jets and low-momentum point sources; scale-dependent dispersion, swash zone (the region of the beach face that is alternately dry and wet) turbulence; wave-structure interaction; exchange processes at embayment-lake connections; residence time in natural water bodies; internal waves in lakes and reservoirs, the effects of macrophytes on the mass and momentum transport processes, gas transfer by turbulence at an air-water interface, sediment suspension by turbulence at a sediment-water interface, and the remote sensing of discharge (flow rate) by optical means. Cowen's work on environmental turbulence, particularly the wake-wake interactions in macrophyte canopies, has lead to his recent push into the field of wind energy with research interests in wind turbine wakes and wind farm siting and optimization. Cowen is recognized as an authority in the areas of experimental measurements in fluid flows and environmental fluid mechanics and is a member of the editorial board of the journal Experiments in Fluids and an associate editor of the journal Environmental Fluid Mechanics.

Email: eac20@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-5140
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=eac20

Daziano, Ricardo

Research Interests: Theoretical and applied econometrics of consumer behavior, specifically on discrete choice models applied to technological innovation and transportation. Daziano's specific empirical research interests include the analysis of pro-environmental preferences toward low-emission vehicles, modeling the adoption of sustainable travel behavior, estimating willingness-to-pay for renewable energy, and forecasting consumers' response to environmentally-friendly energy sources.

Email: ra477@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2018
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=ra477

Earls, Christopher

Research Interests: Earls' Group is concerned with developing novel algorithmic and computational approaches that enable new understanding concerning the actual condition, and future performance of complex structural systems. Practical challenges concerning the principled treatment of uncertainty, sparse sensing, and the complex multi-physics response modalities of the real-world are motivational in our work. The intellectual themes that underpin our research are: computational mechanics, high performance computing, and applied mathematics. Problems of interest to us occur in the domains of engineering and applied science.

Email:cje23@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-1652
Website: http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=cje23

Gao, Oliver

Research Interests: Gao's research interests include transportation and environment/energy systems; mobile emissions inventory and air quality modeling; environment and energy impacts of alternative transportation (fuel, engine, infrast.) technologies, methodological: statistics/econometrics, mathematical modeling & operations research, experimental; and environmental economics and complex networks of renewable energy supply chain

Email: hg55@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-8334
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=hg55

Grigoriu, Mircea

Research Interests: Grigoriu's research focuses on random vibration, stochastic calculus, stochastic differential equations, stochastic partial differential equations, numerical methods for solving stochastic problems, probabilistic models for microstructures, wind/earthquake engineering, and Monte Carlo simulation.

Email: mdg12@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3334
Website: http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=mdg12

Liu, Phillip

Research Interests: My research interests are in Coastal Oceanography and Engineering, including water wave theories, tsunamis dynamics, wave-breaking processes, sediment transport processes, and interactions of water waves with structures. My research approach integrates analytical, computational and experimental methodologies. Our analytical and numerical solutions are based on sound understanding of physics and are validated and supported by experimental and field observations. These analytical and numerical models are then used to further explore physical features in a wide range of physical parameters.

Email: pll3@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-255-5090

Website: http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=pll3

Nozick, Linda

Research Interests: Dr. Nozick's primary research interest is the development of mathematical models for use in the management of complex systems. She has particular interest in systems that can be represented mathematically as networks, including transportation and logistics systems, civil infrastructure networks and project networks.

Email: lkn3@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6496
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=lkn3

Reed, Patrick

Research Interests: Dr. Reed's primary research interests relate to sustainable water management given conflicting demands from renewable energy systems, ecosystem services, expanding populations, and climate change. The tools developed in Dr. Reed's group bridge sustainability science, risk management, economics, multiobjective decision making, operations research, computer science, and high performance computing. Engineering design and decision support software developed by Dr. Reed has been used broadly in governmental and industrial application areas (e.g., civil infrastructure planning and management, airline logistics, and US satellite constellation design and management).  His open source and free academic software related to multiobjective optimization has thousands of users across the world.

Email: pmr82@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2024
Website: http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=pmr82

Richardson, Ruth

Research Interests: A major focus in the lab is the growth of high-lipid producing algae as biofuel feedstock. While algae are reported to be up to 100 times more productive per-acre than land plants, and they can be grow on marginal lands and in saline environments (minimizing competition for land for food crops) many challenges still exist with respect to sustainable commercial scale algae growth and harvesting. In a project sponsored by the Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future, the Richardson group collaborates with the Beth Ahner's and Maureen Hanson's research groups (in BEE and Molecular Biology and Genetics, respectively) to optimize lipid production and develop biomarkers for lipid-production pathways and stress response. Additionally, a new DOE funded project involves genomic characterization of high-performing marine algal strains being grown at a pilot scale in Hawaii.

Email: rer26@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3233
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=rer26

Schuler, Richard

Research Interests: Professor Schuler's research emphasizes the micro-planning, management, and pricing of infrastructure and utilities as well as the societal issues of their institutional structure, regional economic impact, and environmental consequences. He has written extensively on the changing institutional and regulatory needs for the electric industry, including its deregulation. He has also explored basic questions of organizational structure in the information age, using numerical simulation techniques, together with colleagues at Cornell and the Santa Fe Institute.

Email: res1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-7579
Website: http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/em-profile.cfm?netid=res1res

Shoemaker, Christine

Research Interests: Prof. Shoemaker's research focuses on finding cost-effective, robust solutions for environmental problems by using optimization, modeling and statistical analyses. This includes development of general purpose, numerically efficient nonlinear and global optimization algorithms utilizing high performance computing and applications to data from complex, nonlinear environmental systems. Her applications areas include physical and biological groundwater remediation, pesticide management, ecology, carbon sequestration, and surface water pollutant transport in large watersheds. This analysis has resulted in improved policies for environmental remediation and protection.

Email: cas12@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9233
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=cas12
National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Member: https://www.nae.edu/MembersSection/MemberDirectory/56104.aspx
 

 

Stedinger, Jery

Research Interests: Statistics issues in hydrology including flood frequency analyses and climate change, water resource system operation and optimization of hydropower operations, geothermal resource assessment, optimization and systems engineering, and risk analysis models and risk management.

Email: jrs5@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2351
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=jrs5
National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Member: https://www.nae.edu/MembersSection/MemberDirectory/107876.aspx

Vanek, Francis

Research Interests: Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions from freight transportation systems;  Feasibility of alternative energy systems; Integration of transportation energy supply and renewable energy systemsResearch Interests: 

Email: fmv3@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2718
Website: http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/lecturer-profile.cfm?netid=fmv3

 

Warner, Derek

Research Interests: Derek Warner's (Assistant Professor) research effort is aimed at understanding the connection between microscopic physical phenomena and the macroscopic deformation and failure of engineering materials by coupling cutting-edge computing technologies with state-of-the-art simulation techniques. Within this theme, current research efforts involve: (1) the use of atomistic and discrete dislocation modeling to better understand the mechanisms that control the failure of structural materials, (2) the use of micromechanical continuum finite element modeling to uncover the connections between nano-scale mechanical processes and macroscopic behavior, and (3) the advancement of the methods that make such studies possible. For a more detailed description of our current projects please refer to our group's research webpage.

Email: dhw52@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-7155
Website:  http://www.cee.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=dhw52

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Allmendinger, Richard

Research Interests: Forearc Extension in a Strongly Coupled Subduction System, Northern Chile (NSF)

Email: rwa1@cornell.edu
Phone: (607)257-7122
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=rwa1

Brown, Larry

Research Interests: Seismic imaging of the continental lithosphere, GPR investigations of shallow subsurface.

Email: ldb7@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6346
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=ldb7

Cathles, Lawrence

Research Interests: Professor Cathles' current research focusses on (1) the response of the earth to the load redistributions that occurred over the last glacial cycle with applications to mantle viscosity, global temperature and sea level change, (2) chemical changes induced by subsurface fluids flowing across gradients in temperature, pressure, and salinity with applications to mineral deposits, geothermal energy, and mineralogical changes during oil field production, (3) nanoparticle tracer tracer methods with applications to flow characterization, and (4) issues related to shale gas extraction.

Email: lmc19@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2844
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=lmc19

Derry, Louis

Research Interests: Studying biogeochemical processes at multiple time scales, from modern environments to the evolution of couple biogeochemical cycles over Earth history.

Email: lad9@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9354
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=lad9

Greene, Chuck

Research Interests:  Professor Charles Greene’s research interests range from the ecological dynamics of marine animal populations to the effects of global climate change on ocean ecosystems. More recently, he has led algal bioenergy research projects to help develop pathways for transitioning from fossil fuels to more sustainable energy sources. Professor Greene also combines his research and educational interests in ocean science and technology by promoting innovative training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students. Since 1993, he has organized numerous courses in marine bioacoustics that have trained over 300 students from 32 different countries. Professor Greene also supervises the Cornell-WHOI Masters of Engineering Program in Ocean Science and Technology.

Email: chg2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-5449
Website: http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=chg2

Jordan, Teresa

Research Interests: Jordan’s current research divides on two paths: documentation of natural Earth system history, and the geological controls on resources and their sustainable utilization. Examples of the first type are histories of climate change and of topographic uplift over thousands to millions of years in the desert of northern Chile, as well as the history of the 350-million-year ago marine environment in which the Marcellus shale formed. Examples of the second type are studies of water resources in the Atacama Desert, of geothermal energy in sedimentary basins, and of the relationships between Marcellus rock properties and the physical and chemical consequences of human activities related to natural gas extraction.

Email: tej1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3596
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=tej1

Keranen, Katie

Research InterestsKeranen's research interests include the growth, evolution, and deformation of continents. She is also interested in near-surface applications of geophysical techniques, raw data processing and interpretation.

Email: kmk299@cornell.edu
Phone: NA
Website: http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=kmk299

 

Lohman, Rowena

Research Interests: Professor Lohman's specific research involves the use of satellite-based remote sensing observations of ground deformation before and during earthquakes. Her primary focus will be on identifying anomalous behavior along fault zones and ingesting these observations into models of the dynamics of earthquake nucleation and rupture by using geodetic observations of ground deformation, primarily InSAR. Much of her work will involve development of methods for fully capitalizing on the rapidly increasing volumes of imagery available from international satellite platforms.

Email: rbl62@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6929
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=rbl62

Pritchard, Matthew

Research Interests: Research interests include solid-body geophysics, in particular earthquakes, volcanism, and subduction zones, planetary formation and evolution, remote sensing, glaciers, lunar geology, and subsurface energy systems.

Email: mp337@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-4870
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=mp337

Pryor, Sara

Research Interests: Professor Pryor is an atmospheric scientist who works on research topics including climate change mitigation using renewable energy, climate change vulnerability and adaptation for the energy sector and wind energy engineering. In 2014 Professor Pryor was elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
 
Email: sp2279@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3376
Website:  http://www.geo.cornell.edu/eas/PeoplePlaces/Faculty/spryor/

Riha, Susan

Research Interests: My research program addresses the dynamic interactions of plants with their physical environment. The general approach has been to use biophysical models to analyze experimental data collected as part of growth chamber, greenhouse and field studies. The studies undertaken have contributed to our understanding of the impact of flooding on plant water relations, the impact of soil drying on plant growth and water use, and the importance of different surfaces to vapor transport under various crop, forestry and agroforestry systems. The process of utilizing biophysical models to analyze experimental data has in turn layed the groundwork for me to use plant-environmental simulation models to address a number of applied problems. These include such issues as the response of agriculture to climate change, the impact of climate variability on crop yield, improving the use of stored soil water by crops growing in a semi-arid environment, devising drought stress indicators for forest productivity and biodiversity, and enhancing water use in agroforestry systems. As my research program centers on soil-plant atmosphere systems and involves both modeling and experimental work, the studies often cross boundaries between more traditional areas of research (for example, soil physics and plant physiology, or agronomy and forestry) and research methodologies(experimental and theoretical).

Email: sjr4@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-1729
Website:  http://www.eas.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netId=sjr4

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Bitar, Eilyan

Research Interests: Professor Bitar's research interests include stochastic control, optimization, and game theory and their applications to electricity markets, power systems, and renewable energy integration.

Email: eyb5@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-7156
Website: http://www.ece.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=eyb5 

Chiang, Hsiao-Dong

Research Interests: Professor Chiang's research effort is focused on both theoretical developments and practical applications. Particular areas include nonlinear system theory, nonlinear computations and their practical applications to electric circuits, systems, signals and images. He and his co-workers have developed a comprehensive theory of stability regions for general nonlinear dynamical systems (including continuous, discrete, interconnected, hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic nonlinear systems) and their practical applications. He and his co-workers have developed BCU method and Group-based BCU method for fast direct stability assessments for electric power systems. He has developed a new global optimization methodology, called Trust-Tech methodology and is working with his team on the practical applications of Trust-Tech methodology. He and his group also work on the development of computational methods for nonlinear analysis and control of large-scale systems.

Email: hc63@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-5270
Website: http://www.engineering.cornell.edu/research/faculty/profile.cfm?netid=hc63

Hammer, David

Research Interests: High energy density plasmas: we study the dynamics of hot, dense plasma produced from fine wires and thin foils exploded by short high current pulses, as well as plasma produced by high current gas discharges. Experiments carried out with single wires are investigating the physical processes of the wires during the explosion process. Experiments with wires that cross and touch in the middle, in the form of an X (thus, the name X-pinch), are used to generate very high energy density plasmas and high intensity x-ray point sources. Experiments with cylindrical gas-puffs and multiple wire arrays are intended to study the dynamics of the hot, dense plasmas that form when the plasmas implode to the cylindrical axis of symmetry (thus, the name Z-pinch). Many of these experiments address questions related to inertial confinement fusion.

Email: dah5@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3916
Website:  http://www.ece.cornell.edu/peo-detail.cfm?NetID=dah5

Spencer, Mike

Research Interests: My research focus is in growth of compound semiconductors, and graphene, microwave devices, power conversion devices and solar cells. My particular interests are correlation of device performance with material fabrication.

Email: mgs22@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-1721
Website:http://www.mse.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=mgs22

Thomas, Robert (Emeritus)

Research Interests: Power System Stability, Communications,  and Control, Restructuring, Control of Nonlinear Systems, System Reliability 

Email: rjt1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-5083
Website: http://www.ece.cornell.edu/people/em-profile.cfm?netid=rjt1

 

Tong, Lang

Research Interests: Statistical inference, decisions and, signal processing. Future power energy systems and smart grids. Information security. Wireless communications and information theory  

Email: lt35@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3900
Website: http://www.ece.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=lt35 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Avedisian, C. Thomas

Research Interests: We are pursuing research that cuts across a variety of disciplines, including heat transfer and energy systems. Problems are pursued from an experimental (as contrasted with a purely computational or theoretical) approach. Recent projects include studies of droplet combustion; micro-scale boiling on impulsively heated thin metal films; and film boiling with chemical reaction.

Email:cta2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-592-7915
Website:http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=cta2

Fisher, Elizabeth

Research Interests: I use bench-scale laminar flame and flow-reactor experiments to investigate the combustion chemistry of various practical systems. My focus is on understanding the chemical kinetic mechanisms relevant to the formation of desired products as well as pollutants. Applications include: biomass combustion and pyrolysis to produce fuels, biochar, and heat; flame inhibition; combustion of practical liquid fuels including biodiesel and jet fuel; oxycombustion for carbon sequestration; incineration of hazardous wastes and chemical warfare agents. Techniques used include: Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), laser-doppler velocimetry (LDV), detailed chemical kinetic modeling.

Email: emf4@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-8309
Website: http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=emf4

George, Al

Research Interests: Professor George's research and teaching areas are in vehicles, systems, and energy. The focus of his vehicle-related work has been aeroacoustic noise mechanisms and the aerodynamics, performance, and design of aircraft, automobiles, and engine cooling. His other interests are in systems engineering, with research on a systems views of energy use, knowledge engineering, and manufacturing. In the energy systems area he has been working on modeling the systems effects of energy sources and energy utilization and in how to supply information to people making decisions on future energy sources and utilization.

Email: arg2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6254
Website:  http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=arg2

Gouldin, Fred

Research Interests: Combustion, turbulent combustion, premixed turbulent flames, waste incineration and incineration of chemical weapons, fire suppression, scramjet combustion and advanced diagnostics including laser imaging, stereo particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry, Raman and Rayleigh scattering and line-of-sight tomography for combustion research and combustion control sensors.

Email: fcg2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-5280
Website: http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=fcg2

Leibovich, Sidney

Research Interests: My research focus has been on concentrated vortex flows, their transition via the phenomenon of vortex breakdown, and phenomenology underlying breakdown including hydrodynamic stability theory and nonlinear wave propagation. Another area of great interest to me has been the stability of the upper ocean and the vertical mixing of momentum, heat, and matter by Langmuir circulations, a motion caused by interaction of the surface waves and shear in the water column.

Email: sl23@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3477
Website:  http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=sl23

Pope, Steve

Research Interests: Steve Pope's research is in the areas of modeling and simulation of turbulent flows and turbulent combustion. He pioneered the use of probability density function (PDF) models for turbulent reactive flows, and has made various contributions to the statistical modeling of turbulent flows, and to their study via direct numerical simulations. For combustion chemistry, he has developed a number of dimension-reduction and tabulation methodologies. His textbook "Turbulent Flows" was published in 2000.

Steve Pope is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Royal Society, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, of the American Physical Society, of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, and of the Institute of Physics. He has been chair of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics (2006-07), and was program co-chair of the 31st International Combustion Symposium (2006). He is the recipient of the Zeldovich Gold Medal of the Combustion Institute, and of the Fluid Dynamics Prize of the American Physical Society.

Email: sbp2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-4314
Website: http://www.engineering.cornell.edu/research/faculty/profile.cfm?netid=sbp2

Warhaft, Zellman

Research Interests: Zellman Warhaft conducts experiments on the mixing properties of turbulence, which transports heat, momentum and matter many orders of magnitude better than molecular agitation. His interest in this area was stimulated by his work on the effect of weather on microwave radio propagation (Melbourne '67-'69) and on related problems at Ditton Park ('69-'75). He has maintained this contact with geophysics, an area in which turbulent transport is vitally important. In '72, he worked with the air-sea interaction tunnel of the IMST (Marseille). When he was at Penn State ('75-'77) he had close ties to the Meterology Dept. After coming to Cornell, he has spent a sabbatical at KNMI de Bilt (The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute). His present interests are in the fundamentals of the small scale structure of the scalar and velocity fields in high Reynolds number turbulent flows and the effects of turbulence on the formation of raindrops in clouds. Professor Warhaft is also concerned with the social and environmental aspects of engineering and (apart from his more formal teaching obligations) teaches a course on this topic called "Components and Systems: Engineering in a Social Context".  He is affiliated with the Science and Technology Studies Department, with the Peace Studies Program and with the Atkinson Center for a sustainable future at Cornell.  He was Associate Dean for Diversity in the Engineering College from 2003 - 2007 and is presently addressing faculty diversity across the university.

Email: zw16@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3898
Website:  http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=zw16

Zehnder, Alan

Research Interests: My current research focuses on the fracture of nanoscale systems, nonlinear dynamics of nanomechanical oscillators and damage tolerance of polymer matrix composite materials.

Email: atz2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9181
Website:  http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?NetID=atz2

Zhang, Max

Research Interests: Aerosols, Air Quality and Climate Change; Near-road air pollution; Advanced plume characterizations; Air quality modeling; Energy Systems Engineering; Elictrification of the transportation sector; Intelligent distributed energy systems.

Email: kz33@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-5402
Website: http://www.mae.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=kz33

 

Other Contributing Faculty

Abruña, Héctor

Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Research Interests: The Abruña group performs cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research on a wide variety of electrochemical phenomena with current emphasis on fuel cells, batteries and supercapacitors. We employ a wide range of electrochemical techniques as well as x-ray based methods, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry, in-situ FT-IR, confocal Raman, scanning electrochemical microscopy, in-situ TEM, and spectroscopic techniques to address problems of electrochemical interest. We synthesize novel electrocatalysts for fuel cells and carry out computational design and synthesis of high performance organic-based electrical energy storage materials.

Current work involves:

1.  Fuel cells:
•  The use of ordered intermetallics, for the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid and other small organic molecules of potential utility as fuels in fuel cells.
•  The use of core/shell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR)
•  Development of novel catalyst support materials for fuel cells
•  Use of Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (DEMS), in-situ FT-IR in for mechanistic studies related to fuel cells.
•  Development of in-situ TEM techniques for the study of fuel cell and battery materials
 
2. Electrical Energy Storage (EES): Batteries and Supercapacitors
•  Lithium/sulfur batteries
•  Computational screening synthesis and characterization of organic molecules for EES
•  In-situ testing of battery systems using in-situ x-ray based technique (XRD, EXAFS, XANES)
 
Phone: 607-255-4720
Brock, Joel

Applied and Engineering Physics

Research Interests

For over 100 years, our fundamental understanding of the structure of materials on atomic length scales has been advanced by direct structural measurements using x-rays. Modern synchrotrons provide over 8 orders of magnitude higher fluxes than laboratory based sources. This flux enables us to utilize higher resolution: higher angular resolution for diffraction, higher energy resolution for spectroscopies, higher time resolution for dynamics, and higher spatial resolution for imaging. We employ modern synchrotron-based x-ray techniques to measure the structure directly on length-scales ranging from 1 - 50,000Å on time scales ranging from 10-6 - 103 seconds. We are currently concentrating our studies on pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of complex oxide thin films.

The desire to manufacture devices with characteristic features on (sub)nanometer length scales has driven an enormous effort to create thin films with precisely controlled chemical composition, crystal structure and morphology. Energetic processing techniques offer the enticing prospect of gaining additional control at the nanoscale over thin-film deposition and processing. However, our fundamental understanding of non-thermal growth and surface processing is in an early stage of development. We are studying the fundamental processes governing deposition via Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). Empirically, by tuning the substrate temperature, background gas pressure, laser pulse rate, and energy density of the laser pulse, high quality films of many cubic perovskite (e.g., colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), piezoelectric, and high TC superconducting materials) can be grown using PLD. Our time-resolved x-ray structural measurements directly test proposed growth models. This research program is a component of the CCMR's IRG-3 and is based at CHESS.

I am also working to develop the next generation of x-ray sources. LINAC based x-ray sources such as (pulsed) X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) and (cw) Energy Recovery LINACs (ERLs) will create diffraction limited and degenerate x-ray beams that will enable coherent and time-resolved techniques previously only possible with optical lasers. Our long term goal is to generate, manipulate, and utilize coherent x-ray beams for atomic-scale structural measurements on the relevant fundamental time-scales. Discovering and optimizing catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion processes, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), are critical steps on the path towards developing renewable energy production and storage technologies. These two reactions are central to water-splitting, fuel cells, and metal-air batteries. SrTiO3 is the prototype for photo-catalytically active complex-oxide perovskite systems and our research focuses on using x-ray structural techniques to elucidate the (surface) structure-function relationship. Electrochemical studies (in collaboration with the Abruña group) complement the x-ray structural studies, demonstrating reaction intermediates and chemical surface coverage.

Email: jdb20@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9006
Website: http://www.aep.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=jdb20

Clark, Chris

Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

Research Interests: animal science, aquatic science, bioacoustics, biodiversity, biological and environmental engineering, biotechnology, conservation biology, ecology, electrical engineering, entrepreneurship, evolution, ornithology.

Email: cwc2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-2405
Website: http://vivo.cornell.edu/display/individual5549

Craighead, Harold

Applied and Engineering Physics

Research Interests: Our research centers on the new science and applications of nanometer-scale devices and structures. The behavior of these structures, with dimensions as small as tens of nanometers, can be dominated by effects of size and surface area. Essential areas of study include the development of nanofabrication processes and their impact on the properties of materials and devices.

Our work also focuses on advances in the understanding and manipulation of the physical properties of systems of reduced dimensions. Present research topics include nano-scale analytical systems. We are investigating the application of these advances to the fields of optics and biology.

Selected Current Research Projects * Biosensors and Chemical Analysis * MEMS and NEMS * Micro- and Nanofluidics * Nanofabrication * Single Molecule Studies

Email: hgc1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-8707
Website: http://www.aep.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=hgc1

DiSalvo, Frank

Research Interests:  Synthesis and characterization of solid state compounds, disvoer and understand materials with novel cyrstal structures and/or new or enhanced properties, physical properties, such as electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, thermopower, Hall effect and magnetic susceptibility, as well as selected chemical properties, such as eletrochemical behavior, are examined and compared to properties expected on the basis of electronic structure calculations or similarity to known compounds.

Email: fdj3@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-7238
Website: http://chemistry.cornell.edu/faculty/detail.cfm?netid=fjd3

Fennie, Craig

Applied and Engineering Physics

Research Interests

Our interests lie at the intersection of Condensed matter/materials physics and solid state chemistry and can be broadly characterized as centered on the use of theory to elucidate the fundamental principles that govern the relationship between the structure and the macroscopic behavior of complex bulk, thin film, and heterostructured materials in which lattice, magnetic, orbital, and/or electronic degrees of freedom are active

 In this regard we are particularly interested in understanding how the composition, symmetry, geometry, and topology of crystalline motifs influence the interplay among the active degrees-of-freedom, how this subsequently manifests itself in the macroscopic properties, and if this interplay can be controlled so as to produce "designer" properties and functionalities.

We are fascinated by systems in which understanding the structural complexity is key to explaining their macroscopic properties and in particular by systems under extreme environments where chemical intuition often breaks down. Our modus operandi combines microscopic Hamiltonians/models with fundamental principles of solid-state chemistry and first-principles simulations.

Today, first-principles quantum techniques are powerful tools for analyzing and interpreting the properties of crystalline materials, yet the theoretical design of new materials with targeted properties remains challenging. Why? At a somewhat fundamental level, that the laws governing the physics of materials are in fact relatively simple, it is just that the behavior of the constituents as a whole are complex. Indeed, materials are made up of atoms whose type, number, and arrangement - the crystalline motif - creates distinct properties that emerge through the collective behavior of the seemingly simpler, well-understood parts. The discovery of emergent phenomena in condensed matter systems is therefore intimately linked with that of discovering the crystalline materials that display these phenomena.

This work by its very nature has to cross the border between the traditional disciples of physics and of chemistry, and when successful impacts both fields. As a long-term goal of ours is to develop an ab initio strategy towards materials discovery (sometimes referred to as "materials-by-design"), it is my strong belief that it would be quite difficult to make a meaningful and long-lasting impact without engaging both disciplines with the same drive and focus. 

Email: fennie@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-6498
Website: http://www.aep.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=cjf76

Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

Material Science and Engineering

Research Interests: Efforts to manipulate and control materials at the nanoscale have taken center stage in research activities all over the world. These efforts are motivated, in part, by the realization that nanoscale materials often exhibit properties that are dramatically different from their microscale counterparts. In that respect polymer nanocomposites synthesized by adding nanoparticles such as nanoclays into the polymer matrix have attracted considerable attention in recent years. The goal is to develop lightweight composites with potentially superior mechanical, rheological, electrical, thermal and biomedical properties by taking advantage of the high surface area available in the nanoparticles and the accompanied synergistic effects with the polymer matrix. Over the years are group has been active and contributed to these efforts. Specific directions have included 1) chemical synthesis and processing of nanocomposites with controlled structure and interface properties 2) characterization of interface structure and dynamics, and 3) delineation of molecular and structural features that contribute to the mechanical and physical properties of the materials. All previous efforts have focused on fine-tuning the polymer/nanoparticle miscibility in order to achieve full nanoparticle dispersion. More recently we have become interested in manipulating nanoparticles into organized assemblies by exploiting depletion interactions/phase separation of nanoclays and other nanoparticles. Finally, we are devoting a significant part of our recent efforts into the development of "solvent-free" or "dry" nanoparticle fluids. These new hybrid systems consist of inorganic nanoparticle cores functionalized with a charged corona. Because of their molecular architecture they flow like liquids but possess no volatility. Furthermore, because of their hybrid nature their optical, magnetic, electronic, biological and other properties can be fine-tuned to meet potential applications.

Email: epg2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9680
Website:http://www.mse.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=epg2

Howe, Rod

Senior Extension Associate, Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE); Program Director, Development Sociology (D SOC), College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS)

Research Interests: adult and extension education, applied economics, community development, development sociology, entrepreneurship, land use, rural development, sustainable development

Email: rlh13@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2170
Website: http://vivo.cornell.edu/display/individual8662

Kay, David

Development Sociology

Research Interests: David provides leadership for CaRDI programming in the areas of energy, land use and community development. His work on land use involves research, outreach, and training efforts that attempt to build community-based decision making capacity and to help weave local policy into a regionally coherent fabric. Recently, he has increasingly focused on the community and economic development implications of energy transitions. David serves on the boards of several city, town, county and New York State State not-for-profit or government organizations concerned with sustainability and municipal land use planning.

Email: dlk2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-2123
Website: http://devsoc.cals.cornell.edu/cals/devsoc/people/faculty.cfm?netId=dlk2

Kourkoutis, Lena

Applied and Engineering Physics

Research Interests:  Nanostructured Materials, Next Generation Energy Related Devices, Complex Electronic Materials, Atomic-resolution Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy, Cryo- electron Microscopy for Soft and Composite Materials.

The Kourkoutis electron microscopy group focuses on understanding and controlling nanostructured materials, from complex oxide heterostructures to materials for battery and photovoltaic applications to biomaterials.

The presence of interfaces between different components is a key feature of all nanoscale materials and devices. Macroscopic properties of a system depend upon detailed atomic configurations, interfacial chemistry, and electronic coupling. We use aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy to determine the atomic-scale structure, elemental distribution and electronic structure of individual nanostructures and their interfaces.

In order to explore a new range of phenomena and materials we are developing low temperature high-resolution electron microscopy techniques. The topics we are pursuing include: Novel phases that emerge at low temperatures at complex oxide interfaces; solid-liquid and hard-soft interfaces in next generation energy related devices such as photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells and organic/inorganic interfaces in biomaterials.

Phone: 607-255-9121
Lehmann, Johannes

Crop and Soil Sciences

Research Interests I am interested to advance our general understanding of biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrient elements in soil, providing important insight into regional and global element cycles such as the carbon or sulfur cycle. This field of research has global and local relevance with implications for climate change and environmental pollution. The strong background in the chemistry, biology and physics of soils and its cycles provide the basis for the development of intelligent solutions for sustainable soil and land use management. The most exciting examples include the discovery of stabilization mechanisms of organic matter in soil nano-structures and the development of a biochar soil management technology that improves soil fertility, sequesters carbon and reduces off-site pollution. Recent efforts include the combination of bio-energy and biochar applications to soil, which offer the opportunity to develop a carbon-negative energy technology which at the same time improves the environment.

Email: cl237@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-254-1236

Website: http://css.cals.cornell.edu/people/faculty.cfm?netId=cl273

Lei, Xin Gen

Animal Science

Research Interests: Development of a new generation of animal feed and human food of defatted microalgal biomass from the biofuel production.  Functional genomics of mineral-dependent enzymes in antioxidation, diabetes, obesity, and bone integrity in mice, pigs, and primary cells; overexpression and protein engineering of phytases and proteases for nutrition and environmental protection; using pigs as a human model and biofortification to fight against global micro-nutrient deficiencies in humans.

Email: XL20@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-254-4703
Website: http://ansci.cornell.edu/faculty/lei.html

Mount, Tim

Applied Economics and Management

Research Interests: Tim Mount's research and teaching interests include econometric modeling and policy analysis relating to the use of fuels and electricity, and to their environmental consequences (acid rain, smog, and global warming). Professor Mount is currently conducting research on the restructuring of markets for electricity and the implications for (1) price behavior in auctions for electricity, (2) the rates charged to customers, and (3) the environment.

Email: tdm2@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-4512
Website: http://dyson.cornell.edu/people/profiles/mount.php

Muller, David

Applied and Engineering Physics

Research Interests

My group's research at Cornell University is focused on understanding the behavior of materials and devices at the atomic scale. Using some of the most powerful electron microscopes in the world, placed in specially-designed and environmentally isolated rooms, we are able to explore the chemistry, electronic structure and bonding inside objects as diverse as transistors, turbine blades, two-dimensional superconductors, fuel cells and batteries. All of these systems are made up of different materials, and where they join at the atomic scale, the boundary conditions on the quantum mechanical wavefunctions force very different behavior from what might be expected of the bulk materials. At these boundaries, where everyday intuition breaks down, we are searching for new and unexpected phases and physics. The impact of this research on devices, both larger and small, could be very significant. We are interested in students who enjoy both physics theory and experiment, can think in both real and reciprocal space, and care about both why things are, and what they might be used for. Openings are likely in the area of atomically-engineered materials for energy generation, conversion and storage, and studies of two-dimensional materials and electronic phases in complex oxides. Projects range from fundamental science to collaboration with industry.

Email: dm24@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-255-4065

Website: http://www.aep.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=dm24 

Sabin, Jenny

Architecture Art Planning

Research InterestsJenny E. Sabin's work and research is at the forefront of a new direction for 21st-century architectural practice — one that investigates the intersections of architecture and science, and applies insights and theories from biology and mathematics to the design of material structures. Sabin is an assistant professor in the area of design and emerging technologies in architecture at Cornell University. She is principal of Jenny Sabin Studio, an experimental architectural design studio based in Philadelphia and director of the Sabin Design Lab at AAP, a research and design unit with specialization in computational design, data visualization and digital fabrication. Sabin is also a founding member of the Nonlinear Systems Organization (NSO), a research group started by Cecil Balmond, where she was Senior Researcher and Director of Research. She is cofounder of LabStudio, a hybrid research and design network, with Peter Lloyd Jones.

Email: jes557@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-255-2898

Website: http://aap.cornell.edu/people/jenny-sabin

Samorodnitsky, Gennady

Operations Research and Information Engineering 

Research Interests: His research interests lie both in probability theory and in its various applications. A very important area is that of stochastic modeling, and he is especially interested in "non-standard" models, in particular those exhibiting heavy tails and/or long-range dependence. These models behave very differently from the "usual" models that are typically based on Gaussian or Markov stochastic processes. Both heavy tails and long-range dependence are observed in financial processes, teletraffic processes and many other processes. Since many classical statistical tools break down in the presence of long-range dependence and/or absence of Gaussianity, it is very important to understand how "non-standard" models behave, how one simulates them, how one estimates their parameters, and how one predicts their behavior in the future. He is interested in interaction of toplogy with probability theory; applications are, among others, in medicine and cosmology. A major area of interest is studying and modeling extremes in climate and understanding, in particular, whether, in fact, extremes in climate grow faster than the averages. He is looking closely, in particular, at certain financial and queueing models. Other areas of interest include self-similar (fractal-like) stochastic processes, extrema of stochastic processes, zero-one laws, positive and negative dependence in stochastic processes, stable and other infinitely divisible processes and level crossings of stochastic processes.

Email: gs18@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-9141
Website: http://www.orie.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=gs18

Schlom, Darrell

Material Science and Engineering

Research Interests: The focus of my group's research is investigating and perfecting the properties of oxide materials for electronic uses. To do this, we grow oxide thin films on single crystal substrates of closely related substances. The single crystal substrate provides a structural template for the thin films that we grow. The films follow this atomic template and are thus said to be epitaxial (inheriting their crystalline arrangement from the underlying substrate). Our focus on oxides is due to the tremendous promise that these materials hold for electrical applications. Oxides exhibit an unparalleled variety of electronic properties. Insulating, semiconducting, and even superconducting oxides all exist within the set of structurally compatible oxides known as perovskites. This structurally related family also includes oxides that are magnetic, ferroelectric, or even both at the same time. In short, this family of oxides contains the full spectrum of electronic properties. A major challenge, however, is to prepare these materials with sufficient quality and integrate them with adequate control so that these properties can be fully utilized in electronic devices. This is our research goal.

Email: schlom@cornell.edu

Phone: 607-255-6504

Website: http://www.mse.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=ds636 

Wiesner, Ulrich

Material Science and Engineering

Research Interests:The goal of current research in the Wiesner group is to combine knowledge about the self-assembly of soft polymeric materials with the functionality of solid-state materials to generate novel hierarchical and multifunctional hybrid materials. Research results of the group on the use of blocked copolymers as structure directing agents for inorganic materials suggest that in analogy to biology, the sequence information of higher order blocked synthetic macromolecular architectures may be used to encode information about hierarchical structure of co-assemblies with ceramic or other materials. These principles may permit the design of entirely new classes of functional materials that have no analogue in the natural world with potential applications ranging from power generation and energy conversion all the way to the life sciences.

As a particular model system to understand structure formation principles, silica-based hybrids from block copolymer mesophases have been studied extensively over the last ten years. One of the main working principles involves utilizing the thermodynamics of amphiphilic block copolymers, i.e., knowledge about their self-assembly behavior (bottom-up) to structure direct precursors for silica-type oxides. In the meantime these principles have been extended to other oxides as well as to non-oxide ceramics (e.g., SiCN). Synthesis results in mesostructured hybrid materials with structure control down to the nanometer length scale that upon, e.g., thermal processing can subsequently be converted into purely ceramic materials with preserved structure (e.g., mesoporous materials). The final materials have a broad range of potential applications in, e.g., catalysis and separation.

A second major current research direction of the Wiesner group focuses on a novel class of fluorescent core-shell silica nanoparticles, now referred to as C-dots, with potential applications, e.g., as fluorescent labels in biolabeling and bioimaging. Water-soluble C- dots encapsulate multiple organic fluorophores into a solid-state silica environment, thereby improving their photophysical properties as compared to the free dye in water. C-dots have narrow size distributions and in the 20-30 nm size range achieve brightness levels reaching those of semiconductor quantum (Q-) dots with simultaneously enhanced photostability over free dye in aqueous solutions. They are synthesized through a modified Stöber process and overcome toxicity and disposal issues of competing Q-dot technologies. As a result of their optical property profiles they constitute an attractive alternative to existing materials platforms for applications in information technologies and the life sciences requiring bright fluorescent probes. Fundamental studies are aimed at understanding and controlling optical phenomena of this novel class of radiative nanoparticles and of optical structures and devices that integrate them.

Email: ubw1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-3487
Website:  http://www.mse.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=ubw1

Wise, Frank

Applied Engineering Physics

Research Interests: Properties of semiconductor nanostructures- This work ranges from basic physics to applications. For example, we determine the electron states and vibrational modes of semiconductor nanostructures. Example applications include efficient infrared light emitters and photovoltaic devices for solar energy conversion.

Studies of optical spatiotemporal solitons- Optical solitons are packets of localized electromagnetic radiation that propagate without spreading out spatially despite diffraction nor temporally despite group-velocity dispersion. We are working to generate fully-confined spatiotemporal solitons (sometimes referred to as "light bullets").

Development of femtosecond-pulse lasers and amplifiers- We are working to develop sources of ultrashort optical pulses that could be used in applications outside of basic research laboratories. Currently we are focused on fiber lasers and amplifiers. Our activities range from theoretical studies of new mechanisms for shaping pulses in lasers to laser engineering and commercial development. 

Email: fww1@cornell.edu
Phone: 607-255-1184
Website: http://www.aep.cornell.edu/people/profile.cfm?netid=fww1

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